What is in Your Cup?

This post could belong to Tuesday Tech. too! ;) I got a sample of Chamwin’s Ceylon Oolong tea pod.

What is in Your Cup?0teapartynu2013-09-17 05:37:04This post could belong to Tuesday Tech. too! ;) I got a sample of Chamwin’s Ceylon Oolong tea pod.

What is in Your Mug?

What’s in your tea mug? This post is a homage to Steepster (“What’s in your cup?”).

What's in mug? #teaftw

What’s in mug? #teaftw

What is in Your Mug?0teapartynu2013-09-09 15:14:55What’s in your tea mug? This post is a homage to Steepster (“What’s in your cup?”).

What’s in mug? #teaftw…

Thanksgiving Tea Party with Big Bird

Will you serve turkey or some other “big bird” at your Thanksgiving dinner?

 

Thanksgiving Tea Party with Big Bird0Martin Lindeskog2012-12-28 01:49:41Will you serve turkey or some other “big bird” at your Thanksgiving dinner?

 

A Thanksgiving Tea Party, Relax and Enjoy! - Tea Party Guid…

English and Irish Breakfast Tea

My brother gave me a packet of English Breakfast tea and a packet of Irish Breakfast tea from Whittard of Chelsea.

Whittard English & Irish Breakfast Tea

Whittard English & Irish Breakfast Tea

This morning I tested the Irish Breakfast. Their description is spot on:

This full-bodied Assam blend is a malty tea with a deep red-gold colour. Its robust flavour makes it an ideal tea to drink at breakfast time, or as a pick-me-up throughout the day.

(whittard.co.uk)

Do you have a special morning routine?

English and Irish Breakfast Tea0Martin Lindeskog2012-07-16 23:51:36My brother gave me a packet of English Breakfast tea and a packet of Irish Breakfast tea from Whittard of Chelsea.

Whittard English & Irish…

A Short History of Tea

This post is written by Linus Hammarstrand:

Tea is the by far most popular drink in China, even though more and more Chinese are taking to drinking coffee, particularly as Starbucks and various native knock-offs are gaining in popularity. The origin of tea can be traced back to the Middle Kingdom and the Chinese have been drinking tea for close to 5 000 years. According to the legend, tea was invented as a drink by Shen Nong, the Divine Farmer, around 3 000 BC. According to legend, Shen Nong was very health-conscious and personally tested thousands of medicinal herbs to see which ones could benefit his people. Among these herbs, he found that the tea plant had numerous benefits, aside from its pleasant taste.

The tea plant is called Camellia Sinensis and is related to our own camellia, Camellia Japonica. In the wilds, the plant can grow to a height of up to 20 meters. In most plantations however, it seldom grows beyond two meters. The tea plant is evergreen and is currently grown in more than 40 countries. About 90% of all tea that is grown is grown in Asia and China is the oldest tea growing nation on the planet, with a tea tradition stretching back more than 2 000 years.

The Chinese word for tea, cha, is encountered in numerous languages. In Nepal, India and in the Middle East, it is typically referred to as Chai, whereas in Japan it still goes by its original name of cha. Etymologically, the English word tea can be linked to cha.

Tea drinking is typically something one typically connects with Japan, but it was not until the 8th century AD when it was introduced to Japan and the imperial court in Nara, from Tang dynasty China. In the 17th century, tea drinking spread to Europe through the care of Portuguese and then Dutch merchants. From Europe it spread to the New world and to the colonies.

England was one of the last seafaring nations to succumb to tea drinking and it was only through the influence of King Charles II, who grew up in Amsterdam and later married a Portuguese princess, that tea became introduced to the British nobility. From the nobles, tea drinking spread to the lower classes and it was mainly due to the commoners appetite for tea that the East India companies were founded. Some historians claim that the later Industrial revolution was fueled by the worker’s sumptuous consumption of tea with milk and sugar in it, which allowed them to work for long hours in the factories.

Tea can be divided into a number of types: green tea, Oolong and black tea. The difference lies in the degree of oxidation and fermentation. Oxidation happens when the tea leaves turn brown from lack of sap. Oxidation can be artificially induced by rolling the tea leaves so that the sap and the enzymes are freed. Through subsequent heating of the leaves, the oxidation process can then be stopped at any time. Tea, and especially green tea is known to contain copious amounts of antioxidants, as well as numerous vitamins and minerals. It thus constitutes a healthy drink of choice. Thus, next time you sit down to relax with a nice cup of tea, bear in mind not only that it is healthy, but also that it is a drink with a long history!

A Short History of Tea0Martin Lindeskog2012-06-25 15:06:57This post is written by Linus Hammarstrand:

Tea is the by far most popular drink in China, even though more and more Chinese are taking to drinking…

Upcoming Post on Buddha Tea Shop

For your information, Linus Hammarstrand will write a post on Buddha Tea Shop in Thamel, Kathmandu, Nepal, in the near future.

Java Coffee House, Thamel, Kathmandu, Ne by shinyai, on Flickr
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 Generic License  by  shinyai 

 

Upcoming Post on Buddha Tea Shop0Martin Lindeskog2012-06-12 00:23:19For your information, Linus Hammarstrand will write a post on Buddha Tea Shop in Thamel, Kathmandu, Nepal, in the near future.

  by  shinyai 

Rum Tea in the Himalayas

This post is written by Linus Hammarstrand:

Aside from Lemon Tea, Nepali Tea, Chai and the infamous butter tea, the inhabitants of the Himalayas frequently mix their tea with various other drinks. One of the more popular ones in the Nepali Himalayas is Rum Tea, where you mix the national favorite, Khukri Rum with black tea and add a few tea spoons of sugar for good measure.

rum and tea

Rum and Tea

Needless to say, this is a potent brew and not to be recommended for high altitude, although a good reward after a grueling trek or climb! Kick back with your local Gurung, Tamang or Sherpa friends and give yourself a warm treat!

Rum Tea in the Himalayas0Martin Lindeskog2012-05-01 03:46:40This post is written by Linus Hammarstrand:

Aside from Lemon Tea, Nepali Tea, Chai and the infamous butter tea, the inhabitants of the Himalayas f…

Lemon Tea in the Himalayas

This post is written by Linus Hammarstrand:

Nepal is home to some of the tallest peaks on the face of the planet, including Mount Everest, Makalu and Annapurna. Aside from being a destination for hardcore climbers, Nepal is also a paradise for trekkers of all kinds and stripes but no matter how much I would like to include myself in the former category, I am firmly rooted in the later. Trekking is typically hard work, even when doing the so-called easy ones, as Nepal is a very hilly country indeed. After a long day of sweat, blisters and insect bites (or frostbite if you are at a really high altitude), the thing to really look forward to is a cup of hot Lemon Tea.

Lemon Tea

Lemon Tea

This is typically made from one part lemon juice, a few spoonfuls of sugar and whatever bag tea that is available. It is not for the aficionado, but it is a well-deserved treat at the end of a grueling of day of hard work!

Linus Hammarstrand drinking Lemon Tea

Linus Hammarstrand drinking Lemon Tea

Lemon Tea in the Himalayas0Martin Lindeskog2012-04-17 06:09:03This post is written by Linus Hammarstrand:

Nepal is home to some of the tallest peaks on the face of the planet, including Mount Everest, Makalu a…

Cold Tea Drinks

This post is written by Linus Hammarstrand.

In the West we often drink our tea hot, preferably with some sugar and some milk. In Asia however, this is not always the case. One rather recent phenomena in the long history of tea is to serve it cold in a bottle, pretty much as we would soft drinks. Tea sold in this manner comes in many strange and wonderful flavors, ranging from more staid varieties such as Oolong Tea, Green Tea, Chrysanthemum Tea and Lemon Tea, to the positively outlandish, such as Coffee Tea, Bubble Black Tea and various strange Fruit Teas.

Cold tea is sold all over Asia, and is especially popular in summer (or year around in perpetually warm countries such as Singapore). Next time you are sweltering in the Singaporean or Hong Kong heat, instead of habitually grabbing a Coke, do as the locals and go for a Cold Tea!

cold tea drinks

Cold Tea Drinks

Cold Tea Drinks0Martin Lindeskog2012-03-13 01:17:55This post is written by Linus Hammarstrand.

In the West we often drink our tea hot, preferably with some sugar and some milk. In Asia however, this…

Tea Foods of Taiwan

This post is written by Linus Hammarstrand:

There is no end to the variety of tea products in Taiwan. If you go to a local Taiwanese supermarket, you will find tea flavored candy, seeds, drinks, ice creams and porridge, as well as tea-flavored toothpaste, shampoo and shower gel. Odd tea products are however not limited to the supermarkets or to bubble tea vendors.

On a walk through Shilin Night Market in Taipei, we came across this stall, selling food that’s all been cooked, fried or preserved in tea. Fancy pig’s intestines, boiled in Oolong tea? Or why not try the tea-marinated tofu? Just don’t forget to leave some space in your stomach for some tea-flavored desserts!

Shilin Night Market

Shilin Night Market

Tea Foods of Taiwan0Martin Lindeskog2012-03-06 01:33:01This post is written by Linus Hammarstrand:

There is no end to the variety of tea products in Taiwan. If you go to a local Taiwanese supermarket, y…